Dec. 4, 2020

Stephanie Lynn - NSBA Executive Director

Stephanie Lynn - NSBA Executive Director

Stephanie and I talk about NSBA's announcement that they will be sanctioning Hunter/Jumper shows at the new World Equestrian Center - Ocala

​Stephanie Lynn is an AQHA Professional Horseman, Consultant, Coach & Author

Professional Memberships and Associations

  • ​​​​2015 AQHA Professional Horsewoman of the Year 
  • AQHA's Association of Professional Horsemen Council member, 7 years, Chairman 3 years
  • AQHA Show & Professional Horsemen's Committee member 20 years Chairman 2014-present​
  • Service work for AQHA, NSBA, TQHA, MQHA, WQHA as well as local equine groups 
  • ​Member WQHA Board of Directors
  • Member TQHA Board of Directors
  • ​Denton County Board of Agriculture

Areas of Expertise

  • Executive Director - NSBA January 2020 - present
  • Director of Operations - NSBA November 2015-January 2020
  • Owner/Trainer Stephanie Lynn Show Horses 1979-present
  • ​Coached, trained and shown over 12 National, Congress and World Champions
  • ​Judged multiple World Championship Shows for AQHA, NSBA and APHA
  • ​Author A Lifetime Affair & The Good Rider Series
  • Contributing Editor at NSBA's Way to Go and GoHorseShow.com

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Transcript
Tony Bottoms:

Hey Stephanie, how are you doing?

Stephanie Lynn:

I'm good. How are you?

Tony Bottoms:

I'm good. So for everybody who doesn't know, go ahead and tell us who you are and kind of give us a little bit of your background.

Stephanie Lynn:

Sure. My name is Stephanie Lynn. I'm the national snaffle bit association executive director. I've been in this position for a year. I took over in January. It was the director of operations at NSBE prior to that for four years. And prior to my coming to the national snaffle bit association, I was a horse trainer and judge and coach coronation and author. So I've spent my life in the horse industry. I've always made my living from the horse industry and carrying it on now and some association work. Okay.

Tony Bottoms:

So for our listeners, you said you're the executive director, which would have been the Appaloosa CEO. That's been changed too. Executive secretary I think is what they changed it. All right. So, well, isn't it. I had you on is you guys just recently announced. That you're going to sanction shows at the world equestrian center, the new world aggressor center in Ocala, Florida, and the big announcement was these were straight Hunter shows. Can you elaborate on that a little bit?

Stephanie Lynn:

They are, they would be horse shows that are offering only a hundred jumper classes. And there'll be some real classes along with them as well, but they are not in the, you know, in the all around show section of our rule book. So they are for shows that have requested sanctioning and they will only be holding Hunter jumper classes and their target audiences, Hunter jumper group. But. Those the warm bloods and, uh, you know, the thoroughbreds. So it would be that type of horse.

Tony Bottoms:

Do you, Seth crowd is typically FEI crowd. All right. So let's start off with, let's talk about this facility. Number one, it's a brand new facility down there in Ocala, Florida. It was built by Robbie Roberts and from my understanding it's a really, really nice facility.

Stephanie Lynn:

Yeah. It's an amazing facility. And I've been there twice. I was there, um, mid summer and they still had, you know, a lot of things under construction, but a lot of things already built as well. Obviously it's a very large, as far as you know, just the scale itself. I think 16 arenas. I, I don't know exactly all what all of the logistics of the setup, but it's a beautiful, beautiful showplace. And I think someplace that we'll continue to see a lot of different shows and events being held there, you know, there's the, the kind of room where you could have a dressage show being hosted in one arena and, uh, Appaloosa show and another and a soccer meet going on somewhere else. And I mean, it's, it's just a really, uh, uh, cool multipurpose facility as a really neat stadium. That's in front of their hotel and surrounded by, you know, four little restaurants and big screens. I mean, it's just, there's not a detail that was not thought of, they did a fabulous job and they're designing and it's, it's really a beautiful show place.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. Seen and listened to some interviews with Robbie and Jenny about this new facility. Cause I guess part of it was Jenny and I believe his mother was like a project manager or something like that for the whole facility was being built or, you know, it was a family affair. What'd you say it that way?

Stephanie Lynn:

Yeah, I think that, um, mrs. Roberts was definitely the. The design person. I know she had her hand in a lot of the, you know, down to the details of things. There's some beautiful bronzes, some. I'm really neat art on some of the buildings that were hand painted by some local artists. And there's a candy store. That's just, it's just out of this world. It's just really, really a beautiful show place. And all the walkways are that the fabric that's made out of the break, the crushed rubber, you know, it looks like like brick, but it's not, it's actually a rubber kind of

Tony Bottoms:

no. Okay. Yeah.

Stephanie Lynn:

Next year, whatever stalls all have rubber baths in 'em. All of the stalls have, uh, I think there's 10 in a grouping and then they have a real tack room with a door on it, with the door lock and you know, all the saddle racks, the whole deal. It's just, it's just really well thought out.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah, that's cool. Yeah. I heard something, but like, it was like 600 acres. It had like 12 indoor arenas and then however many outdoor renters I forgot, but. Now this isn't the only facility they have. They have one in Wilmington, Ohio, and I know they were talking about the one in Wilmington, Ohio. What they'll do is the big jumbotrons that they have in the arenas that they'll do like movie night and then they have volleyball. And so they are definitely making it a place where you can come and hang out for a horse show if you're going to be there for an extended period of time. And like you said, they had the hotel and then they had the. The cabins, they call the HomeAway's or something like that. Of course. I don't know if you really call them cabins because some of them are like,

Stephanie Lynn:

yeah. And really pretty cool for your, you know, for the trainers and people that would come with, you know, our families that would come. And that's the, you know, the neat thing about being in Florida in general, that area itself, for those that aren't aware is, you know, an hour from Orlando and, um, you know, probably an hour or so from Daytona beach and. About the same from crystal river and the beaches on the Gulf side. And you know, so there's a lot of local amenities too. So it really is a vacation destination for families. And I think that those HomeAway's kind of lend themselves to the people that are setting up camp there for the whole winter for a week or 10 days at a time. And yeah, I think that they're very slick.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. Okay. So let's get back to the NSPA stuff. So this is kind of a new thing for you guys, as far as I'm aware, you guys have never sanctioned a straight Hunter show that I'm aware of. Am I right or wrong on that one?

Stephanie Lynn:

Uh, we would have sanctioned special events that would be on the front side of say an Appaloosa horse show or an AQH a horse show, uh, that, you know, that want to just do the one day special event. So that would be. The only time that we would have sanctioned Hunter show in the past, this will be the first time that we're sanctioning a Hunter show that is standing alone as an NSPA sanctioned event.

Tony Bottoms:

Okay. So my understanding is, since you guys have announced this, that your membership has definitely gone up.

Stephanie Lynn:

Yes. Yeah. We have, um, everybody, you know, for those who aren't aware, everybody that competes in an NSPA class, both the owner and exhibitor have to be members. So all of the owners and exhibitors that are going to be showing at the work shows this winter will need to be members and all of their horses will have to be registered within SBA. So even those horses that don't fit into one of our breed Alliance partners, they would have to be registered within SBA. And most of those horses are microchipped already. The NSA board of directors did recently pass a bylaw change requiring horses that are unregistered to be microchipped. So in the past on registered or unpaid bird horses, you had to take four pictures, a picture from, you know, each side of the horse and then get a veterinarian certificate stating the horse and verifying the age. So this kind of simplifies that process. They'll still have to add the horses age verified, but they'll be able to use that microchip number and not have to do the photos.

Tony Bottoms:

Okay. So let's talk about that for a little bit. So in NSPA you have what is called the recognized breeds, correct? Correct. Appaloosa paints, quarter horses, all that at POS. And then you also, you can still show in his BA with an unrecognized breed, which is what a majority of the hunters would be, because like you said, warmbloods thoroughbreds and combination of the. Whatever. So they could still show in SBA as the rule stood because they would just fall under the unrecognized breed, but they would have to go through, like you were just saying, taking the pictures and all that. But because most of those horses are already microchip. You guys said, okay, well, if they're already microchip, you've already got all that information for the microchip. So we'll just accept that.

Stephanie Lynn:

Correct. And usually the microchip Tauruses also have records somewhere else, or we can verify, and whether it's the, you know, the Welsh pony association and if they're ponies or they might have their numbers on file with S H J or USCF, or, you know, a lot of them have that recognition somewhere else. So we also have a, a place where we can recognize other breeds, whether it's, uh, an ovarian or, you know, whatever that might be. But the, you know, the horses that fall outside of those Alliance partners are recognized. Associations would have to have the microchip.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. Cause that was one of the questions that we had from a friend of ours. A friend of ours has a, uh, a foreign lady Welch and she was wanting to breed to chocolatey. And cause we were telling her about all the stuff that he was involved in, you know, as far as the futurities and all that kind of stuff. And so she was looking at it and she's like, well, the Welshes are not in recognized breed. So how would that effect they wouldn't be able to do the fraternities. Is that correct?

Stephanie Lynn:

Correct. Yup. Okay. Yeah. And they'd be able to show in any NSBE, all breed class, you know, so we've already, since the inception of the navel too. Register is through the POA ways and thoroughbreds through the jockey club. And, and then of course, all of the association courses, and then in 2019, we opened it up as a way to be able to recognize the different horses that didn't necessarily have papers on them. A lot of your ranch horses don't have papers. Uh, either because they didn't keep up with them or maybe they are just grade horses, but most of the time it's because somebody just didn't keep up with the paperwork, but we've had since 2019, the ability to register horses without papers.

Tony Bottoms:

Okay. So the NSPA really didn't have rules for the hunters. You had the working Hunter and all that, but so are you guys kind of having to rewrite some rules or. Do things different here or how's that working out for you guys?

Stephanie Lynn:

Sure. Well, we did have working Hunter rules. So we had rules in place. We have the no English rules of a hundred underside or whatever you want to call it. We have the English equipment rules and already had all of those things in place. We did not have jumping brules. So we did expand our Hunter jumper section and really what it came down to was defining what some of those classifications are. Their class descriptions are different than. That they're accustomed to showing under are different. So this year and SBA added pleasure driving performance, halter branch trail, branch rail, and then the Hunter jumper division. We added the jumping. So the rules were there. But not the class descriptions and the parameters. So this just like for the brand rail, we have been actually holding a ranch rail class at our NSBE world championship show for two years. Well, with the growth and popularity of that, you're seeing people that want to have just rant shows and we didn't have the rules in our rule book. So we actually, uh, people that are familiar with NSPA, we'll see quite a few additions to this 2021 NSBE rule book.

Tony Bottoms:

Okay. So you guys got a whole lot of stuff going on

Stephanie Lynn:

now. He did. Yes. Yes. Like I said, you know, the driving horses, those are our people and the performance halter. We didn't have standalone rules for that. So yes, we did expand our rule book.

Tony Bottoms:

Didn't notice thing is right before world that you guys did do it was not really a rule change. It was more of a. Cleaning up the verbiage of the working Hunter. And it was basically talking about the headset and that the horse should move at a pace as if following the hound. So basically kind of cleaning that up a little bit, which I thought was interesting because it all sudden the announcement about sanctioning and the shows at WEC came out and I was like, huh, I wonder if those two are. Related somehow, or if it just happened to be that's the way it worked out. Right.

Stephanie Lynn:

Right.

Tony Bottoms:

So how long have you guys been working on sanctioning the show at

Stephanie Lynn:

WC working on it in one capacity or another? Since April. Okay. This is when they first approached us about, you know, the potential to sanction, some horse show dates for them.

Tony Bottoms:

So you guys have been working on for a while then, so you guys kind of had to keep it under wraps for a little bit, huh?

Stephanie Lynn:

It really wasn't anything to keep under wraps. We didn't have anything to approve until we had something to approve. So, you know, we talk to people every day that want to put on a horse show and they want to offer, you know, an all breed pass along with their Pinto paint, Appaloosa horse show. And it may or may not come to fruition. So we talk to people every day that are looking at different avenues to put on horse shows, that'll draw their crowd and allow their trainers and their participants to put horses on the trailer. So we didn't do anything until we actually had a show application in hand, we didn't know what would happen. So there wasn't really. Anything to do, because as I said, they were, we were able to sanction the horse shows without changing any of our rules. So we didn't need to do rural changes to be able to, you know, sanction these horse shows.

Tony Bottoms:

Right. Right. Okay. So what about the Hunter jumper ponies? Is that a challenge or is that already handled if you guys, cause I know. With regular Hunter jumpers, they got the regular horse classes, but then they also have pony classes. And I haven't read in SBA rule book from cover to cover yet, but. I don't remember seeing anything specifically about pony classes.

Stephanie Lynn:

There's not anything specific about bony classes. As I said, we already do sanction and recognize the pony of the Americas group of ponies. And they also have a very different class structure than what you might see at your Appaloosa or your quarter horse show. They have girls and boys classes, their age groups are different. So all of those things and SBA has always had in place. And I think one of the draws of NSBE to sanction your horse show is that we do allow the show manager. To offer classes that suit their customers. So that's really where we see ourselves fitting in with the Hunter jumper group too, is that, you know, the, the needs in Ocala, Florida are going to be different than the needs in maple, plain, Minnesota. Or Ogden Utah, there'll be different and they'll have a different group of clientele that has different needs. And we can allow those classes to be held as long as they abide by the other rules, the drug rules, the ownership rules, the membership rules. So that's, I think one of the sweet spots of NSPA is that we. Allow show managers to decide what kind of classes they want to offer. And then we help give them the guidelines and the governance to make that happen. So to your pony question, the ponies will have to be measured and you know, we'll have measurement cards and then measure mental, go on their permanent records, the POS right now they handle that themselves. So we're always as secondary to the POA association. And so the POA association handles their pony measurements and SBA does not, but I would imagine we will start now recording the POA measurements as well, because it will be a benefit to the PLS.

Tony Bottoms:

Well, see, that was gonna be, my question was with the ponies because POS are actually more strict than USEF rules are as far as height and stuff like that. I know with Yusef. But once you get your pony card, you pretty much got it. It doesn't really change, but I know POS it can. I mean, they will, might measure your pony before you're going in a ring. So they're, they're a little bit more strict. So I was curious as how you guys are going to handle that, you know, whether you're going to be more on the Yusef side or more on the POA.

Stephanie Lynn:

Sure. So, and SBA will give ponies at six years old, they'll get a permanent. Measurement ponies that are, you know, three, four and five will have to be measured each year. And we'll have a, you know, a process in place. There's a process in place now and measurement cards. So they will have to be measured prior to show. And so if there's a four year old pony that was measured to compete in USCF in 2020, before they could compete at the LEC shows, they would have to be remeasured. After January 1st of 2021.

Tony Bottoms:

Okay. So it sounds like it's a little bit of a combination of both, but so they w will get, after a certain age will get a permanent card. Correct. Okay. So it sounds like it's a little combination of the two. So does this mean, have you guys been getting phone calls about sanctioning more straight Hunter and jumpers and other places? Now

Stephanie Lynn:

we have a lot of questions. The general interest. People wanting to know how it works. What do you have to offer us a lot of questions about things like pony finals and equitation finals, those events that are super important for the children and you know, also for the greeting aspect of the ponies and those horses. So a lot of questions from show managers, just asking, how do we do it? How do I do the same? What are the requirements? And a lot of people trying to educate themselves.

Tony Bottoms:

Okay. Well, I know we have been, cause my wife comes from the Hunter jumper world. She grew up in Richmond, grew up riding hunters, all that kind of stuff. So she still has a lot of friends who are out there on the East coast that ride hunters. So we've been kidding, a lot of questions from them asking about it. And it seems from the people that we know. They're very excited about it because you said is kind of had a monopoly over the Hunter world for decades now. And to have a new governing body step in and start sanctioning shows another place for them to go. That is less expensive because you know, in SBA membership is $65 register. Your horse is $35. Whereas Yusef is I think like 900 and something dollars. So it's, it's expensive, you know, it, I think a lot of people were very excited, especially on the Hunter side. And then we're excited because my wife comes from the Hunter world. She's a little bit disappointed in the breed show Hunter under saddle sheet, got your guys is working on her, was great because it was much more comparable to straight hunters than the breed show. And so we've been trying to get that. We've been thinking about going more into straight hunters with some of our, our year lanes and stuff like that. And so all of a sudden, you guys make this announcement, so we're like, great. So now. If you guys start sanctioning more Hunter jumper shows, we don't have to change. We're staying with you guys doing NSPA stuff and doing other, you know, doing a Hunter and jumper. So I think it stirred up a bunch of excitement on both sides, I think.

Stephanie Lynn:

Right?

Tony Bottoms:

So the Hunter jumper stuff is not the only stuff that you guys have been doing at WEC. You guys actually have some other stuff lined up like. Thank Tom powers is getting ready to happen down there right now here in like a week or two, something like that.

Stephanie Lynn:

Yep. Tom powers, I believe will be the first real event that goes on at the world equestrian center in Ocala. But Tom powers was scheduled to be in Wilmington, Ohio, this June, and because of the dates, it was just a little bit early to feel comfortable to, you know, be able to hold the horse show with. COVID and all the travel restrictions. So they did decide to move the show to December and to be in Ocala. So I think it's going to be an exciting kickoff. You know, the Roberts have been holding a Hunter jumper shows and breed horse shows of our traditional stock horse breeds for quite a while at Wilmington, we've had some of our biggest NSBE. Dual approve tore shows have been held at Wilmington. I know that the world equestrian center is also getting ready to kick off a big horse show. That'll be an all breed. It'll be an NSB only horse show, but it'll be geared towards that all around horse towards the Western pleasure Hunter under saddle trail. And I think the last backer, they said there was going to be a little over $350,000 that people would be riding for. And that show is being held. I believe it's the end of April. Um, the first part of may of 2021.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. That's the, uh,

Stephanie Lynn:

it's a sudden end calls.

Tony Bottoms:

Certain impulse. Yeah, I keep, yeah. Keep thinking of sleepy impulse, the stallion. Okay. Sudden nimble. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. I remember reading about that one. Well, that's cool. And it sounds, they've gotten a lot more going on down there and then it, you guys might have a lot more on your plate. Two coming up. I'm interested to see what happens with all this. If more hunters start asking for you guys, the sanction shows and kind of expanding that, I think it's going to be good for the average person, you know, Yusef was kind of more of a higher end kind of show. And especially down there, no Calla hits Ocala. Now I know when we lived in Richmond, then one, it was the big place you went in the winter time and there's a lot of money given away and all that kind of stuff. But. You better have a pocket book if you want to go down there and do it.

Stephanie Lynn:

Yeah. I think that the track that you go on is different with the two different groups as well. You know, the people can say that Yousef is expensive, but at the same time, they provide a different service. They provide a service that helps you be in Alliance with the FBI, and that helps you follow that track and get to the Olympics. So, you know, their purpose is, is a little different than ours. We are. You know, we're trying to think in horse shows and provide those or shows, like you said, maybe some of those places that have facilities that no longer meet the standard of the USCF shows, you know, still have somewhere to go to have rules and record and, you know, provide with year-end awards, provide with goals. So all of those things are still important to people and. We're definitely of the belief that, you know, a rising tide raises all ships and, uh, that should be our, our combined goals as industry leaders and industry associations.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. I agree. I agree. Like I said, I'm really excited to see what all happens with this and see where it's going. And. I know that we're excited and a lot of our friends are excited about it. So like I said, I'm very interested to see what happens with it. And I don't know. It's just going to be, it's going to be interesting. Well, I think that's pretty much all I have. Is there anything that I forgot that you would like to cover or. Something to mention the peak anybody's interest.

Stephanie Lynn:

I think like you said, people will be very interested to watch and see how it goes. I think that those of your listeners who may be strictly USDA riders should not be fearful that there, that NSBE does not know how to handle the drug rules. Those things have already all been in place and have been in place again for decades. We've been drug testing, our horse shows. And been following the protocols, really from the lead of the different USCF labs. We have Alliance agreements with other associations where we are constantly re adjusting our rules. So I think that they should have their fees there. Any fears kind of, you know, there, isn't a reason to be fearful, I guess, is what I'm trying to say. We've been sanctioning more shows for almost 40 years for 35 plus years. So I think that they'll be pleased with our ability to be nimble and to get things done for them. That will benefit that group of horses, riders. And like you said, for yourself, your eaters and trainers. You know, if we don't have a reason for you to keep breeding horses, then, then we're all in a, in a tight situation. So we need to make sure that you and your wife want to continue to breed Appaloosas and hunters and whatever that might be.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. I'm sure you guys are going to do a good job. It is interesting because you know, like I said, my wife came from the Hunter world. And then we moved back out to Oklahoma and that's when we got involved with the breed shows. And she'll admit that she came with some preconceived ideas of what breed shows were about, you know, her and her mind, you know, a bunch of country monkeys out there, rotten backyard ponies. And obviously she was showing that that's not true. So she's like, look, a lot of these people are going to have that idea. And she said, they'll realize that that's not the truth once they get into it and start showing. But that's been a lot of what she's been dealing with with the people that she knows is getting rid of those. Preconceived misconceptions that they have, or these ideas that they have that they've been told or whatever, you know, like one of them is that breed shows, you know, break down horses, but by the end of their two year old year, because they're out there riding them two years old. And so, you know, cause the a hundred jumpers, they don't really start working them until they're older them and they'll put them under saddle at two years old, but then they'll, they weren't really start riding them until they're about four. And, you know, she'd like, she's been explained to all her friends. She's like, we do the same thing. I mean, our horses have more show experience by the time they hit three and four, because we have a lot of in hand classes that we can go do. And so it helped the horses out. My wife was saying the other day, she's like, look, the breed shows are really good about making horses. She goes to hunters are really good about making riders. You know, they're making riders about actually

Stephanie Lynn:

they are. So

Tony Bottoms:

she goes, I'm going to be interested in seeing when these two opposite sides of the fence get together in the same barn and start talking. She goes, I think that's where a lot of the synergies going to count from, as you get the two sides talking and, Oh, how'd you do? You know, you know, how'd you do that. And then they start sharing ideas and all that. And she goes, that's where I think this is it's really going to take off when we start doing that. And we start getting those two different sides together.

Stephanie Lynn:

Well, I, I definitely agree. They do an excellent job in education. They take it seriously. They honor their teachers. They honor the coaches that are, you know, that are good instructors, where we tend to give more recognition to the trainer who can go win in the show ring. They give a lot of general reverence. For those trainers and coaches who can produce riders. So that's to be that's to be recognized and hopefully our people can learn from that.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. And then the other thing is like where we were at in Richmond. I mean, I could probably name half a dozen lessen barns. They were show barns, but they also had lessons. Like if you didn't have a horse, you want to go take lessons. If you lived in Richmond area, there was. Yeah, easily, probably a dozen Barnes. You could go to, to go take lessons. Your parents could know nothing about horses or riding, and you could go learn how to ride. You don't really see that so much on the breed show side.

Stephanie Lynn:

I agree.

Tony Bottoms:

And I think that's where we're missing out. I think that's well not you guys, but like the Appaloosas and quarter horses and all that. I think that's why their numbers are shrinking because they're not feeding that youth program. And you don't have lesson Barnes too, for those kids to go, Hey, I liked this. I want to own my own horse. And then they start showing, you know, so I think that's where they are. The hunters are really good about that. I mean, that's just constant, but

Stephanie Lynn:

I use that as an example, when I'm doing some different speaking events to, especially to our young trainers that in, in this area, in rural Chicago, when I first looked and when I first moved down into this position, Or, you know, down into this area to take this job, but in SBA you had to go to page five on a Google search to get a Western lesson in this area.

Tony Bottoms:

Really? So what do they have a lot of hundred bars there

Stephanie Lynn:

in that area? 100 barns, tons, a hundred barns, tons of counter opportunities for lessons. And I think, I think now you don't have to go quite so far. There's a couple people that have built really big programs and. You know, so you may be on the app to go to the second or third page on a Google search. And, you know, Google has changed too. You

Tony Bottoms:

know what I'm saying?

Stephanie Lynn:

Four, but they do an excellent job of bringing up good riders and teaching good horsemanship.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. I mean that, I could see that because they're in Richmond, like the barn where my wife was at, they didn't teach Western. They was all straight hunters. I mean, but I mean, that's what they're known for. I think they had one Western horse there and it's just. It happens to be, she lived right down the road and she needed a place to keep her home

Stephanie Lynn:

well. And I think the other thing that we have that our traditional Western group has to offer this group is, you know, a lot of those warm bloods are pretty big and pretty hot. And you start getting in your. Fifties, sixties and seventies. And maybe you think you can't ride anymore. Riding that Western horse still offers a superior challenge as far as competition and learning and you know, and has a completely different demeanor. And so I think that it may be offers some of those riders, an opportunity to stay in the saddle a little longer.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. Yeah, that is true. They didn't same thing with the POS. Yeah. I mean, you got, you got grandma that wants to ride, but, and then her kids or her grandkids are showing, it gives, affords her the opportunity to go show. At the same place to her kids and her grandkids are showing that and they can make it a family affair. Yeah. I think that's a great idea. Yeah. Well, thank you. Ma'am I appreciate it. I know you guys are going to do a great job with this. We're really excited to see what happens with it. L's I see as good things happening and I'm pleased as punch it. You guys did this and I want to say thank you. I know there's a lot of other people that want to say that too, but you'll hear it from me. I want to say thank you that you guys actually did this. And like I said, I'm just, I'm excited to see what happens with it.

Stephanie Lynn:

We are to Tony. So thank you for the opportunity to speak to your clientele. I appreciate it,

Tony Bottoms:

but thank you. I appreciate you coming on. You guys have a good day.

Stephanie Lynn:

Thank you. Bye.

Tony Bottoms:

Well, there you go. Yeah, that was Stephanie LAN executive director of the national snaffle bit association. I know, by the way, Stephanie forgot to mention, which is telling us about herself. But she was a professional horse woman of the year in 2015. I just thought you'd like to know that. Yeah. Sounds like there's a lot of stuff going on over at NSPA and at WEC, if you want to keep up with what's going on at the NSPA, you can follow them in sba.com. And if you want to keep up with world equestrian center. You could call them@worldequestriancenter.com. They have a calendar of events. You can go in there and see what's going on. I know I just recently saw they got some dressage shows coming up in January. They're official grand opening is January 1st, 2021. So I'm sure after the beginning of the year, there'll be a lot of stuff coming up. I'm sure there'll be filling up their calendar. I know the world of questions, trainer in Wilmington pretty much stays busy year round. They're always got something going on. I can't believe that Ocala is going to be different. It might be even more busy. Who knows. Anyhow, I hope you liked the show. If you did, please subscribe and share it with a friend. And if you get value from the show, please go to buy me a copy.com/appaloosa and buy me a virtual coffee and help to show out. Y'all have a good day happy trails.