June 3, 2021

The Success of the Garden State Appaloosa Association with Lori Wunderlich

The Success of the Garden State Appaloosa Association with Lori Wunderlich

I talk to Lori Wunderlich about the success of the Garden State Appaloosa Association and what other Regional clubs maybe able to learn from them.

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Transcript
Tony Bottoms:

Hey, how you doing welcome to the only podcast that talks about the Appaloosa horse and the people who love them, wherever that might be. I'm your host, Tony Bottoms. And today we have a conversation with Lori Wunderlich. Lori is on the board of directors for territory five, but the reason I had her on the show is she's been a member of the garden state Appaloosa association for many years. And the garden state of Appaloosa association is probably one of the most successful regional clubs in the United States. So I kind of wanted to pick her brain and find out what it is that they're doing that is so successful and what we might be able to take away from that. But before we get into apple news and talking to Laurie, I don't know if you've been following. My Facebook or if you've been following Heather's Facebook, but we had a very large tragedy for our family. We lost one of our brood, mayors, bubbles. She was the mother to bruiser, who is our world champion and she's mother to the one month old backs that we have now. That was a chocolate. He get. She kicked a wall and basically destroyed her leg from a pastor and down. I mean, we took her to the best surgical vet in our area and he told us there was nothing he could do about it. It just was too much damage. And he said, even if he tried some heroic, he was pretty sure it wasn't going to work. So we ended up putting her down. And then backs wouldn't take any mayor supplement or anything like that. And so we lucked out and we found a lady not too far down the road from the vet clinic that had a mayor who just lost a full Monday night, Tuesday morning, somewhere along in there, it was still born. And so. We brought her over. And as of right now, they are getting along. Backs is nursing from her, very sweet ma mayor. Her name is sunset. Like I said, we got her from a lady in really the reason I'm saying this is, I want to say thank you to everybody that knows us. Who knows is just from Facebook. We've got. Within a few minutes of Heather putting out that we lost bubbles on Facebook. We had people contacting us saying we have a mayor that we're getting ready to ween. We had other people who contact us and we had this marriage, the loss of full. If you need her, let us know very genuine outpouring of people wanting to help. So from the bottom of my heart, I say, thank you to everybody that was as supportive. We've got hundreds of messages of people telling us, however they can help let us know, and we'll help them. The love and support from everybody has just been overwhelming. So again, from the bottom of my heart, and I say, thank you for all of that. And so moving on, we are still doing the booth at youth world and nationals. If you'd like to help out, you can go to buy me a coffee.com/appaloosa and buy me a virtual coffee. Or you can go to patrion.com/appaloosa become a patron of the show. Any of that will help out in anything over $50. We'll put your company logo, or if you got a stallion and we'll put your stallion on the banner behind us, or if you got something else that you want to put up there, then that's fine. As long as it's not inappropriate. And also if you like to help with. Helping us offset the vet costs of all this. Because as you know, there is some vet costs involved with that. The interesting thing is the taking her and backs up there to the surgical. That wasn't as much as it was the emergency farm call when they showed up that cost us, I think more than actually taking them out there to the surgical vet. But that being as it was, you know, I think we've all been in that position at some point in time. Maybe not to that extent, not to that end, but I'm sure we've all had to make a farm call before, but anyhow, if you'd like to help out of that way, we're not the kind of people who ask for charity and ask for donations. We're not going to set up a GoFundMe me. However, if you go to. Eight KB Quine, Facebook page. And you'll see the tumblers that Heather's making. If you would like to purchase a tumbler contact, Heather, let her know what you'd like. You know, we can customize them, go on there and take a look and see what all. You like got a few different ones to choose from now, we're just kind of getting started in this. So, you know, we're, haven't got a good stock built up yet. So basically everything's being, as we're getting the order it's being made, being custom made and sent out. So it takes us a little bit of time. Sometimes they now. Let's go ahead and head over to Appaloosa news. Matt desires, 2009 eight PAC bay stallion tire by TD and three in Alec Kela figment. Matt desire was the 2010 world champion non-pro year lane. 2011 unanimous world champion. Non-pro two year old, 2011 reserve world champion open two year old and a 2012 reserve world champion opened three year old. Man desires poles are winning thousands and major maturities, such as best in the west. And the goldmine surf. All his foals are eligible for NPHC halts for charity best in the west maturity, east coast, halter fraternity, APH stallion auction, incentive classes and breeders truck. Matt desires get, have gotten multiple world and national champion high point award in nation, man desires phoned by Johannah downs and is standing at CNC show horses and equine production owned by Cindy and Craig Polly. You can reach them at (951) 743-5653. Okay. So for Appaloosa news, the first thing I want to tell you about is. The youth world in a national premium book is out. It is on the website now. So if you've been waiting for that, go to the website, it's there. It was out as of Wednesday. The second I know this show becoming on the third, but it came out yesterday, basically. So Wednesday second is when it came out. The second thing is Appaloosa ranch, horse association. Has announced that they'll be awarding three custom saddles to the high point senior high point junior and non-pro ranch horses at the world show in November. The stipulation is you have to be a member of Appaloosa ranch, horse association kind of makes sense on that one. Right. And it also absolute sires is doing their raffle. For a 16 inch custom hair saddle that will be given away at world. Also contact anybody that it's on the board of absolute sires or Babblers, a pleasure horse association, and they should have tickets $25 per ticket. Or you can get five for a hundred dollars. So let's head over and talk to Laurie. Yo time with TC Tommy boy, they 15 one hand a PAC 2010 black leverage stallions by the miracle chip out of money. Primary proudly owned by TC performance horses in Corrington Tennessee. Tommy will be staying in at J Barez training with Jim and Sandy and Gainesville, Texas for the 2021 breeding season study is $1,000. The army is one of the last stallions by the hall of fame. The miracle chip as a point 20, the miracle chip is still in the top 10 of leading the nation in performance and halter socks. Tommy has proven his versatility. It exposes wonderful temperament time and again, by achieving the 2019 first Stony champion with numerous wins in rope, race deal, race ranch trail, brand dry branch, raining branch rail judge heading and heeling deer Navin inboxing reserve, real champion and root brace to bronze medallions and performance. Rope brace does senior judge healing by roams in rope, race ranch, trail ranch, riding ranch, rainy and ranch. Real pleasure territory, high point the road, breeze ranch raining senior judge healing. Non-pro boxing and ranch trail DOP, tans and road, race ranch, riding ranch raining senior rainy senior judge heading Tommy boy's five panel negative, please call TC performance horses at one three eight two six six five two. The book ingredient to your mirror, proven mayor really liked to talk to you. So give her a call. You'll be glad looking for English and Western pleasure, ranch, Cal bread and games, horses to breed this remark or with a legacy of pass off, literally guardian off the road. I mean, I ran in, took a shower, ran out. So Anna I'm actually clean and at home. So that's kind of a rarity when I'm doing these. So Laurie is obviously on the VOD now just recently liked it to be a D, but the reason that I wanted to have her on, and she's been part of the garden state Appaloosa association for quite a while now. And when I think about regional clubs and. The ones that I see doing shows and all that garden state is definitely up there. I mean, you see them all the time, Delaware, the one out of Michigan, Carla peacock down in Texas, and then with spotted valley or west coast, I don't know. I think that they're the same. I might be wrong on that one, but those are the ones that I see active. So I kind of wanted to pick your brain and find out. What it is you guys do is it's so successful. What is it that you guys are doing? That's getting that kind of activity and in membership and all that kind of stuff. So I guess to start with, kind of give us a little bit of history of the GSA and how long they've been around and all that kind of stuff.

Lori Wunderlich:

Well, in 1991, there were three Appaloosa clubs in New Jersey. We had New Jersey Appaloosa club tri-state and also a club called week ado. And the membership at that time decided that they would get together and they would merge because the volunteer base was getting small. You know, they were getting older and decided that they could, they just couldn't do it all. So we merged together in 1991. So we've been together for 30 years and we kept the show dates. We kept everything the same. We just merged together and used, utilize the volunteers out of all of the group to keep us going. And we're still using some of those same volunteers

Tony Bottoms:

there. Okay. Yeah. I know. I saw a purse. I think it was Carla peacock was like she was making the Calabash. She's like, you know, I'm kind of getting up there in age. I'm starting to get tired. Somebody else kind of needs to step in and kind of start taking this over because. She's like, I don't, I just don't know how much longer I can keep doing it. You know, that's a lot of work doing a show is a lot of work. So other than show you how many shows you guys have

Lori Wunderlich:

three multi-jet shows a year, which are on the original dates, that those three clubs had their dates. And then three years ago, we added what we call our single day back to basic shows to try to get entry-level people, to come into the horse show world. And I'm just give them an experience. They're one judge. So they don't have the large horse club fees. And some of the other things that go along with it, we hold them at Willowbrook, which is for anybody that's into raining or knows anything like that. It's where Joe Cody was. There were a lot of, lot of raining shows and stuff held there many years ago. So we've been holding our shows there for three years, a whole two of those a year. And then garden state is part of gear, which stands for greater Eastern Appaloosa regional. We started that three years ago. We didn't start it. We brought it back. It had been a big show series back in the eighties. And some of us decided that we needed to try to get and bring it back. So

Tony Bottoms:

who all is involved with gear

Lori Wunderlich:

gear is a conglomeration of Keystone Delaware, garden state, and also Western Massachusetts.

Tony Bottoms:

Okay, so Keystone would be Pennsylvania, right? Okay. All right. Yeah, that sounds like you're not kind of talked off air before and we're Heather grew up in Virginia. You got a lot less than barns, but they also have their show barns and all that. And they were all holding their own little shows, but they're all kind of like competing together against each other. And then they. Got together. And this was several years ago, obviously this is, you know, we left there in 2006. This was way before then, but they got together and they formed their own club or their own. Association. And then they sat down. They're like, all right, you have the show on this weekend. This barn has a show and this barn has a show on this weekend. And so they made sure they weren't all competing, but then they got together and they helped each other out for the shows. Kind of like where you guys were sitting, talking about, you guys do with combining the clubs. And at the year end, they all have their one big year end awards and points and all that. So kind of sounds like you guys kind of did the same

Lori Wunderlich:

thing we did other than we just did away with the New Jersey club and the week of ado club and we just formed a brand new club.

Tony Bottoms:

Right, right. Okay. So w what is it that you think makes you guys as successful as what you are? What are some of the programs? I know you guys. Do raffles and stuff like that. And that kind of

Lori Wunderlich:

stuff. Board of directors that kind of think outside the box a little bit. So they decided we wanted to do, you know, a saddle raffle. So we've done a saddle raffle twice now, and we have done, you know, we do our shows and then up until about five years ago, we did what we called a poker run. Which was like a, a trail ride, but there were buckets of cards out on the trail and people went out, took the card out, whoever had the best poker hand at the end of the day, you know, one, and then we had a big potluck dinner and that was very successful for us. For awhile. I have to say that, you know, the last year we didn't have as many people come, but it is something that we talked about and thought about doing again. We're also conducting clinics and we do them throughout the year. We'll be having two clinics between the Keystone and the gear show, which are sponsored by gear. One of them is a trail clinic or having Jonathan Mueller come in. And he's going to be spending the day with people learning trail and then Sandra Koski is going to be there. She's judging the Keystone show. She's staying over a day and she's going to do horsemanship and showmanship. One of the things that I think probably makes us as successful as anything is that we try to listen to what probably seeing how that works. Right. Always, you know, do everything. And I'm a big proponent of we'll try anything as long as we have people that'll help us. You know, like the one day shows Ted say, Jack came to me and said, he'd like to help sponsor them and wanted to try to really get new entry-level people to come in and a new crowd. And so we run them as an open show with Appaloosa classes and we do it with the Appaloosa rule book and we, but we opened them up to paints quarters, whatever wants to come and show with us. And they've been successful. We had said we would give it three to four years because you can't. Do anything just one year and say, oh, it didn't work. You're going to make mistakes the first year. So you gotta fix those mistakes and, and move on.

Tony Bottoms:

Right. So have you guys, I don't know how much Pinos are up in your guys'

Lori Wunderlich:

area. Jersey has a lot of Pinos, north Jersey does not. And I I've said before, we kind of have a Mason Dixon line down across the middle of New Jersey. Cause you know, all of our horse shows are held in south Jersey. But I live in north Jersey and we used to have them all in Branchville, but there's no indoor ring there. So people don't like to come to the horse shows if it's going to rain, they all might melt. I guess

Tony Bottoms:

it's funny. Cause you know, like I was saying, Heather grew up riding hunters out there in Virginia. In most of those Barnes out there don't have indoors. I mean. All the shows are outdoors. The only time you get to go to an indoor arena is usually at the end of the year, the regionals, you know, and that's pretty much it, most of the shows are, and most of the shows are one day shows there. It's not until you start getting up into, you know, like level the, a levels and all that, where you're starting to get into more of the professional stuff that you see to your three-day classes or shows. Most of the shows are single day shows, you know, Two, we hit three shows in one day, one time.

Lori Wunderlich:

I'm originally from Ohio. I remember showing, you know, when I was a youth, a long time ago, we would show on the Eastern side of the state one day and drive all the way across the state, you know, asleep in the front of the horse trailer and show the next day and van work, which is on the Western side of Ohio. So most, everything was one day. We've just evolved so much in the last 30 years. And we're spoiled. There's no doubt that. That we are spoiled. We want to have indoor arenas. We want to have that. But along with that comes a price tag. Fortunately.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. We've been talking about trying to do something here at the house, but yeah, I don't know where it's something we're going to be able to do for awhile. But now you were saying the cause I had talked to Jeffrey Oaks about some of the stuff that he wants to try to do, starting that in the new Tennessee club. And one of his ideas was with the trail. People is have them come and help with the shows and then show people going to help at the trails. But you're saying here as late the trail kind of thing is not right. Really for you guys isn't really, you know

Lori Wunderlich:

what happened at least over here. The trail people have formulated a group of their own, and they do a lot of trail riding, you know, just call each other on the phone and say, Hey, we're going to go out for a trail ride on Saturday at one o'clock do you want to meet up and do that? So organized trail rides are not real popular around here anymore. That's not to say that in two years, that will change. But even like, we used to have a huge big St Jude's trail ride, and everybody went on it. Whether you had a show horse or you kind of just plan the whole. You're around that St. Joe St. Jude's trail ride. And the last couple of years, that hasn't even been as, as successful as it was. That's not to say we don't have people riding trails. Cause we have a really big extensive trail system where they took all the old railroad beds and they fell the railroad tracks out and the railroad ties. And so it's really good footing. It's everything's really nice. And so people just go out and they do that and they're kind of doing it on their own. I don't know why, you know, like, I don't know why they're not looking to the clubs to do trail rides, but at least in our area, in the Eastern United States, anyhow, organized trail rides are not as popular as they are.

Tony Bottoms:

Right. I think I read about that, where they're taking out the train tracks and making those trails. And I don't know if it was there or if it was someplace else, but that was, that was before we left Virginia. So that was clearly that's written about that. What's your demographics for your club? I mean, Jersey is kind of one of those states where it depends on where you're at. It could, you could be rural or you could be

Lori Wunderlich:

when we used to do our shows in Branchville, I'd always get a phone call from the judges. And I could almost tell you exactly where they were because they were coming out of Newark because that's where they flew into, which is, you know, oil tanks and. Across the rivers, New York city, and they'd come out here and then they'd start going up route 15. And there's a place on route 15 where it goes from very, very city-like to very rural and just about a half a mile. And they'd call and they'd say, are you sure we're still going the right way? And you're going the right way where we are up in north Northwestern, New Jersey. It's very rural down where the dream park is, where we have our horse shows. That's in Southeastern Southwestern, sorry, New Jersey. That's also very rural down there. It's very flat, a lot of farmland, tomatoes, peppers, you know, all that, the good garden state crops up by us. We have some Hills and mountains, certainly not mountains like out west, but mountains for New Jersey. And then there's a lot of in-between. Most of our people. I would say probably 75 to 80% of the people board their horse. So they don't have their horse at home. It's not in their backyard. They're paying somebody to take care of it. And they may live in New York city, or they may live down closer to the city, Hoboken down in that area. And then. You know, the barns are in the rural part of the state. Okay.

Tony Bottoms:

That sounds a lot more, what we're used to in Virginia is, you know, because land is so expensive there, most people board, but you know, they're getting out and showing and stuff like that, which, like I said, I know people listen to show and talk and watch the show I've said before, you know, like here in Oklahoma or our regional club has one show a year, but it seems obviously out here it's more. The open shows that do well, you know, in particularly the Calla classes and the ranch classes and all that kind of stuff. Is that still true for you guys?

Lori Wunderlich:

We probably don't have anybody. That's seen a cow cattle classes are not very popular in New Jersey. I laugh about that. They are becoming a little more popular because the ranch classes are becoming more popular. And so, you know, people are kind of combining the two, but I would say most of our show people it's and you would think where we are because we have a huge hunter jumper population down by Bedminster, which is where you, you know, the U S CT was. And there's all of that. You'd think that we'd have a lot of hunter jumpers that are horse shows. And we used to 10 years ago, our jumping classes where some of the biggest around we don't have that anymore. If we get. You know, three or four and hunter hack. We're lucky courses are kind of almost non-existent right now, but I think that's like anything else that's going to come and go. I think people will start getting to be a little bit more competitive. They'll decide that they want to maybe do some hunters, maybe do some the jumping right now, ranches the rage, and we'll have 18 to 20 and a ranch class, which we'll laugh about that. You know, we're in New Jersey. What are we doing with the ranch class? But.

Tony Bottoms:

Let me ask you this. So Heather, Kevin from straight hunters and coming out here to the breed shows and we can go to a straight hunter show and she can sit down and she can judge that class. And usually she'll go, this is horse number one, this horse number two. This is horse number three, and boom gets it almost every single time. We came out here to the originally, went to AQH and breed shows. And chills, like she'll judge the class and it's not even close. Right. It doesn't mean what she says because a judge on a completely different it's something different. You know what I'm saying? Right now, w when we went up here to NSBE and NSBE was doing their green hunter, or excuse me, their working hunter, Heather named the class. You know, just boom, boom, boom. So they are getting more back to what an actual working hunter is. What Heather's used to is as far as a hunter. So my question for you is. Has something changed in that timeframe when you guys were, had a lot of hunters showed up at your shows and now they're not, is it possibly the judging? Cause I know that can be very frustrating if you're coming from a hunter and you go to a breed show and like people won't even

Lori Wunderlich:

look at it. I think there's two things that happen there. I think the judging did have something to do with it. I think we are getting back now to judging more the way the hunters do. And, you know, everybody says, well, how do we know that's right? Are we right? And that's, you know, the proverbial which came first chicken or the egg, but I also think the hunter world was not real receptive to colored horses then. So there weren't many Appaloosas that went to the hunter jumper circuits. You know, if you had a colored horse. They wanted nothing to do with it. If you had a solid color, that was a good way to market your solid colored horse. And they had, you know, the brains of an Appaloosa, but they had. You know, no color, a lot of, a lot of our hunters and jumpers in this area up here are the stock type breeds because you know, you can put kids on them. It's a little different kind of horse. You know, we have a lot of off the track there brands, but we don't have very many kids riding an off track.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. Yeah. I lost track. The arrays were very popular and appendix appendix were very popular. So I mean, but you're getting that thoroughbred back in there. Yeah, the Heather, her first horse that she bought for herself was an Appaloosa. And she showed him their re you know, locally and Virginia. And it's like she said, they didn't want to pin him high, but there was hardly anybody around. It could be over a fence.

Lori Wunderlich:

And my daughter showed a horse out of the, out of the hunter and we would take him. To the hunter jumper. Cause we have a hunter shows here not too far from us, about five miles away from home at the fairgrounds. And they hated to see him coming because they knew that he was going to be hard to beat and he wasn't loud colored or anything else, but he was, you looked at him and you knew he was an Appaloosa and they just weren't real receptive to them. They're better. I mean like you can go to a hunter show now and it's not unusual to see. A paint or a blanketed Appaloosa in the ring.

Tony Bottoms:

I keep telling people Keller's getting hot over on that side of the world. I mean, they're definitely looking in with, oh, shoot at is completely went blank on his name is spot mother, boy, get that went down to Wellington and one down there and they're starting to get some, of course he's a solid, but they're starting to see. And then. With NSBE now taking over down there world of equestrian center and they're definitely starting

Lori Wunderlich:

to, and I think that's, what's going to happen. You know, there, the breed is getting to be more popular, not as poplars. Of course I'm on the board. I'd love to see it a lot more popular, but I do think that they're coming back now. We just have to get some people to breed them. Cause it's very hard to find a horse it's extremely hard. You know, there just aren't a lot out there because you know, three, four years ago people weren't breeding like they are and they were well,

Tony Bottoms:

it's interesting because I've been watching. Inside of apple loses an Appaloosa baby doesn't sell for that much, but then you look outside of Appaloosa, particularly since they're starting to get popular with barrels and in the cattle and stuff like that, they're going for good money outside of Appaloosas, which is. Frustrating because, you know, you gotta be in that area, but at the same time, it's like, this is the horse that we cherish. And there are people who are like, oh, it's got color and they're paying more.

Lori Wunderlich:

It's funny. You know, like even people out on the trail, we have part of that railroad bed that goes by the farm and people will stop. Everybody on the trail and they'll be like, wow, we didn't know. They came in all these different colors and, you know, w we got a couple solid ones, but, you know, with our lesson program, we only use Appaloosas. And so we've got them from solid all the way up to leopard. And when we take the little kids out, like when we do a camp in the summer, we take them out on the trail and there'll be, you know, 15 of them lined up there and we'll always get stopped. And so when we figure we're taking all the kids out on the trail, We got to allow an extra half hour, so everybody can stop and look at them and see the differences. And that's kind of nice. I think that's the only way we're going to get the information out. You know, people have to see them and it's really what advertisement is to see little kids riding them, because then people realize that they're, you know, what their temperament is. And, you know, I think that that's another reason why our club has been successful because we do have people that get them out in other venues.

Tony Bottoms:

Right now we were talking before, cause I was talking about four H and stuff like that. So you've been involved with four H for quite a while now. And you incorporate your program, your riding program into the four. H can you talk about that a little bit? Well,

Lori Wunderlich:

I start, I mean, I started out in four H when I was kid, but then I went to college and I ended up being a four H in an ag agent in Ohio. And then when we moved to New Jersey, I started a four H club over here and. We provide horses for judging contests. We provide horses for a lot of things and, you know, it's our goal that when we get in front of four H kids, we have recognizable Appaloosas out there so that they can see them. And I think that's important. The other thing that we do as a, as a club garden state sponsors the highest placing Appaloosa at our state four H horse show. And we also had a longtime member who always showed halter horses. So we have an award that's in Judy Harrison's memory. To the highest place, Appaloosa, halter horse, you know, we're trying to get the Appaloosas out to the four H kids also to the FFA kids. FFA is not as strong in New Jersey as it is, as you get a little bit more west, but we do have an FFA program, but the forage program is pretty strong. And even within our county, when we go to the, you know, the fair we have the state fair here within our county. And we always make sure we have those recognizable Appaloosas I think we have to market our own horse and we don't maybe do as good a job as we should.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. Yeah. I know there were saying that that's how she got started with horses as four H you know, cause she couldn't afford a horse and I couldn't afford to the lesson program and all that. I mean, she eventually started taking lessons, bitch. That's how she's always four, eight. Yeah, here, it's more four H is what you do before you get to FFA level, you know, because FFAs like high school, but I think that's starting to change a little bit. I know when my son was showing hogs that we went to a couple of shows and there's quite a few four H older, four H people there, and they're like doing both four H and FFA. So did you guys start? What were you doing? Like the horse judging? Is that how you guys start? Because you said you provide horses for the judging competition. Is that what the four

Lori Wunderlich:

H is doing? And the coach for the state, for the New Jersey state, for each horse judging team, I've always been really active in horse judging. And so I ended up having to help put on the judging contest every year. So we usually have to provide horses of some way shape or form. So that's how, you know, we get them out in front of the people as well, you know, and we'll have a hundred kids, that'll do the judging contest. And I always say like, when we have the judging contest at the Appaloosa nationals, there's probably more people in the stands for the judging contest. By the time you get all the parents and coaches in there, then there are classes are in the ring. But I

Tony Bottoms:

was wondering about that because I was listening to. The paint horse podcast and their last show that they did was about internship. They have internships, they have like one or two that's there for the entire year, but then they have like three or four for summertime, and then they have three or four for like fall, you know, which obviously summers when they're doing their shows and their world and all that kind of stuff. I was wondering if we had something like that. And I thought that would really be cool is if you could. Like the four H kids, when you guys have a horse show, then they can be a scribe for a judge. And then, so they're seeing what that judge is doing and all that kind of stuff. Well, one of the requirements

Lori Wunderlich:

that I have, I mean, and I'm fortunate because we do have so many shows in New Jersey, but one of the requirements that I have for my judging kids before we go on to the national contest is that they come to a horse show that we're putting on and they scribe for one of the four judges. Because I think that's a very important part. And if we're supposed to be preparing these kids to be judges on down the road, then they need to know how to scribe. And there's nobody better to teach them than somebody that's a judge and they want, you know, they liked, I've never had a judge that refused to have one of the kids be their scribe. They really want to teach the kids. I think most of our judges are, are. You know, thinking about the fact that they don't want to do this for the rest of their life either so that they need to have somebody to make a replacement for it.

Tony Bottoms:

All right. Well, is there anything that I didn't think of to ask that you can think of?

Lori Wunderlich:

I think, you know, when people talk about regional clubs, I think you have to remember to listen to your membership and if they're looking for clinics and they're looking for that kind of thing, if you have a way to provide them, and then you have a facility that you can provide them in the winter, That's a great way to keep the interest going all winter long. You know, if you're only providing horse shows, then you're only going to have horse show people as your members. But if you want to have a well-rounded membership, then you have to have a well-rounded club. And one of the things that I wanted to do is to approach some of our trail riding groups. And they're not organized groups, you know, they're not like organized like a, an Appaloosa horse club would be. But to see what they want and if they would be willing to, you know, sponsor something with us, because we just don't have that trail group right now and we need to contact them and try to get people involved. So that's on my agenda to try to make a contact with, you know, a trail riding group and see if we can get that going again.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. I was just talking to. Trying to remember the name and the comfort of the club tear in Oklahoma, but it's basically like the Oklahoma trail riders association or something along those lines, but they're involved with a national group that is their main goals, preserve trails for request trains. That's their whole, the national group. So I would assume that there's probably a group in each state, at least one, like. The lady I was talking to was saying that, you know, like they go out and they get money. Every year from the national organization, but they do fundraisers and stuff like that. And they'll go to like this, this year, they might pick a particular trail that they'll go improve it and make sure it's maintained and all that kind of stuff. And they'll go around and they've done that to several trails here in Oklahoma. And it sounds like they're fairly well-organized, but again, I mean, halfway across the country for you guys,

Lori Wunderlich:

cause we have our, you know, our railroad bed and what they do is they look for. Groups to come in and sponsor, not necessarily monetarily, but more just maintaining the trail, you know, making sure that there's no litter on the trail, making sure that's done. And also, you know, if we have a storm or we have something like that, they go out, they clean up that maybe a mile or two miles or five miles, whatever they decide as a group they can sponsor. And so I was on the phone with, with the guy this week as to, you know, is there a way that we could sponsor, you know, maybe five miles of the trail and. We get involved in cleaning it up and helping maintain it. Think that, you know, that's, if more groups would do that, I think that there's a lot of contexts that we just don't always think about. And I think we just have to, you know, share, I think regional clubs need to share what they're doing.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. I agree that. Cause like I said, I know you guys I've talked to the people out there from the Delware club before, but yeah, I think that's, if you guys got something good going and. No, the other clubs should at least ask also be an ass. You know what I'm saying? But I know they got that website that, or excuse me, that Facebook group now for the regional clubs, I haven't really gone in there and really looked a whole lot at it to see what's going on. But yeah, that, that's some of the stuff that I've been trying to think about is what can we do for non horse people kind of draw a man for the regional clubs or, or even a national club. What, is there something we could do to at least get them to come in and. Take a look around and maybe volunteer at you know, regional club or something like that. So, I mean, that's, I know Hannah, because Sarah, so saying that some of the things that she's thinking about

Lori Wunderlich:

too, I think one of the things that you have to do, you can get people to volunteer, but you have to make sure you have a job for them. You know, we can ask and ask an ass, but if we don't have anything for them to do, once they get there, then we're not going to get them back a second time. Even if they come and volunteer to a horse show and, you know, they can pass out ribbons, they can make sure that, you know, the judges cards that run back and forth between the announcer and the, and the ring stores and that there's always jobs at a horse show, but you just have to think about them. And, you know, like I try to write them all down at the beginning of the year, what we need, and then, you know, just. Throw it out there. Anybody who doesn't have anything to do on Saturday, we're going to be at the horse show Saturday and Sunday, please come. And I think we can do that same thing for like trail rides and some of the other activities clinic. What kind of stuff, you know, but when you, when somebody volunteers, you better have a job for them. Cause I wouldn't go back. You know, like if I volunteered to do something and nobody had a job for me, I probably wouldn't go back either. So you can't blame this human nature, right?

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. Yeah. I've been in situations like that before. It's like, I'm here. What do you want me to do other than just

Lori Wunderlich:

staying home. And nobody wants to

Tony Bottoms:

in around here for a reason. Was there anything else, any other ideas?

Lori Wunderlich:

I don't think so. My big thing is just to share, you know, I, I think. None of these ideas are sacred. They just need to be shared amongst each other. That's I started a territory, six newsletter is to the board and I, you know, we do a newsletter every quarter and we're trying to get it so that we're sharing this information between our territory, which goes from Michigan all the way up to Maine. And then down to Delaware, just to get that information out there. There's some good things going on. That we don't all hear about because, you know, we don't get outside of our little bubble.

Tony Bottoms:

There's a write up in Appaloosa journal about a lady that came from the Netherlands, is that right? And moved to Washington. And she was talking about that. She went to a writing program and. That's how she got involved with Appaloosas and all that. So I mean, stuff like that, you know, now she's interested in doing the chief Joe one, one year, if she can and stuff like that, you know? So, and then I know there's been a couple of people who are on Tik TOK that have like 200 something thousand followers on Tik TOK. You know, stuff like that. Just it's great for exposure now. I don't know how you convert those people over to members, but it's good exposure, you know, at least. Yeah. That's what I was thinking. I was like, all right. So how do you get those people on Tik TOK to become members? You know, even if they are not riding a horse or they're not participating in shows or whatever, how can we. Convert them to at least get them. Because once you get into the showing, once you get there and you start meeting the people and see how fun it is then, or trail ride, you know what I'm saying? Then, then that's how they get hooked. And that's how it was like, how could we do that? And I know that I'm sure there's somebody out there smarter than me. That can go, oh, I got

Lori Wunderlich:

this on a personal level, but. My grandson is six, but when he was two, because we live out in the country and we're on the farm and he was not going to school yet. He didn't have a lot of socialization with other kids. So my daughter decided to start what she called our mommy and me program for two year olds and their moms came. They didn't have to ride. They actually just had to watch, but we did a little riding thing with the kids. And then the, they had a little craft that had to do with horses and. That really has taken off now probably have about 50 of those little kids every week, that kind of, you know, riding Appaloosas. So I think with people you just kind of have to keep, I don't want to use the term, shoving it down their throat, but they have to just keep seeing it over and over and over again. It's amazing. Cause like all of a sudden they'll maybe hate burden for 10, 10, 11 weeks, and then they'll go if these are all Appaloosas why are some of those solid? And some of them have, you know, white. Behinds. And some of them are, you know, a leopard. And so it's an opportunity to talk to them and give them a little bit of education on top of it. You know, we're definitely trying to hook in them, through their kids. That's really important. You gotta meet them

Tony Bottoms:

where they are. I've seen that happen more than once where the parent will bring in the kids to start taking riding lessons. And then. They ended up buying a kid, a horse, and then the mom's like, well, you know, she used to ride and she's like, wait a minute. She's having way too much fun. And so then she starts getting back into it. So yeah, I've seen that, definitely seen that happen before,

Lori Wunderlich:

but, and as far as getting those people on tic-tac I think we just have to ask them, you know, we just have to say, you need to come to this horse show, you know, somehow get a, you know, get a feel for them and, and get them there because I, I agree once they're there. They'll get hooked,

Tony Bottoms:

but didn't see that. I think some of the issues too, is it's hard to, in less you're on, you know, say the apple is the website or the Pinto website or the NSPA website. A lot of people don't know about the horse shows like there's the, we got a Roundup club right down the road from us, I would say about five miles or so when we know that there's around, when there's something going on around our clubs, when we drive by and see it, you know, So,

Lori Wunderlich:

well, we don't toot our horn very well. Right?

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. So that in actually here in a couple of weeks, I might have a solution for that problem, but we'll wait until then I actually have found, I was introduced to something that might help alleviate that problem. To some extent. Well, that would be nice. Yeah. And I

Lori Wunderlich:

think, you know, I have to say that I think that, you know, doing the podcast and doing some of those things, you're just getting that information out there. We just have to get it out.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah. And I've been, I've been thinking and about that a lot here lately, because you know, with, like I said, the tic talk and the Instagram, you know, there's there girl here in Oklahoma Jones, a horse named tattoo. 18,000 followers on Instagram. And actually I've been trying to get her on the show, but she's really shy. You know, like all the Instagram stuff, you never see her, you always see the horse, you know, so she's like, I like it that way cause no one knows who I am, but I'm like, I kind of feel with the podcast that I kinda, I'm kind of preaching the choir a little bit. Right. We

Lori Wunderlich:

need to get, get that out and we'll hopefully whatever you're done, cooking here is going to help us.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah, well, and that's like, that's why I started doing this, this live. And cause this gets broadcast to three different Facebook channels. It goes answer Graham. It goes to Twitter, it goes to YouTube and it goes to Twitch, which in Twitch is you start off as a gamer thing, but it's starting to pick up. So I'm like, okay. And that's talking with the people who are doing the Instagram and the. Tick tock. I'm like, okay. So they're getting to people outside of our little bubble. How can I do that? How can I get to people? And that's where I started talking, thinking about YouTube and Twitch and all that kind of stuff. So that's what I'm trying to do for sure. It's not easy, but I'm trying to learn from these other people, you know how they're doing it and I'm watching them and trying to see how they're. Getting it done and trying to get some of them on the show to talk to them about it. So other people can get good ideas. Got no there's I am not a creative person. I'm not, I'm a, I got a bachelor's is green at county. If that tells you anything. Right. So I am a bottom numbers, you know, my list and schedules and all that. That's the kind of person I am not really a creative person. And so I know there are people out there who are much more creative than I am. They could probably do stuff, you know, with this show or, you know, take talk and all that. So I watch them, I have to watch them cause you know, I, I can come up with some ideas, but for the real creative stuff, there you go. Oh, wow. Yeah, that's not me. And I accept that. We all have

Lori Wunderlich:

embraced. They all have our strengths and our weaknesses. And I, again, I think that's what we have to realize in our regional clubs as well. You know, use those people's strengths and, and don't ask them to do something that they're not comfortable doing.

Tony Bottoms:

Yeah, that's true. It's like, I always tell, I used to always tell everybody data, you know, Heather for us is the creative one and I'm the one running around, making sure the squeaky wheel gets the grease, but I've actually, I started changing that. I said, I'm the force multiplier. When she needs force, you know, whether it's fixing a fence or whatever, or she's having issues with a horse on the force multiplier, I think why she wants to do, and I multiply

Lori Wunderlich:

it.

Tony Bottoms:

Right. Exactly. So, ah, well, thank you. Ma'am I appreciate it. Thank you. Well, let me ask you that question. I'm going to ask that question. So there w there waving qualifications for world, and some people were saying that's going to hurt the regional shows. And do you believe that? Do you think that's true?

Lori Wunderlich:

I can honestly tell you that at the beginning, I thought, yes, it would. It wasn't that I wasn't in favor of it. I wasn't in favor of announcing it at this point in time. I don't know everything and it has not hurt our regional shows. Our regional shows in the Northeast have been as large as we've ever had them. And we have two coming up in a couple of weeks. And you know, we're well over 200 stalls and, and growing. So I guess it really didn't in the Northeast. I'm not sure about the other, you know, other parts of the country. We have a pretty strong show based up here in this area. And so it, it hasn't hurt us, but

Tony Bottoms:

you said you had a lot more volunteers here lately, too with COVID

Lori Wunderlich:

and we've gotten a lot more members. I keep getting memberships and I'm like, I don't know who these people are not. I knew everybody in our territory pretty much, and it's really nice to get new people, you know, people that I don't, I've never heard of before. So that's a good thing. I liked that. So

Tony Bottoms:

you get a new member. Do you guys send out like a welcome letter or something like,

Lori Wunderlich:

well, we, we send them a little note that says, you know, thank you for your membership. And we send them all of our, depending on where they're from, we send them all of our Facebook pages or websites, depending on what the clubs do. Cause you know, a lot of the clubs have let their websites go just because of the expense. So they're using Facebook primarily, but you know, we we'd let them know about everything. I let them know about the territory newsletter. And if they have any questions, this is who your board of directors are. Some kind of a little welcome letter and a thank you for joining. Well,

Tony Bottoms:

that's cool. Yeah. I, I, I didn't think about that, but I know that was one of the, the discussions about not having qualification for world. People were worried that it might hurt the regional shares and, you know, you, I mean, you're there, so I, yeah. I'd like to find out from some of the other people, right. I mean,

Lori Wunderlich:

I, I think there's not going to be much of a way to know that until we get to the end of this year, you know, last year, It was definitely because of COVID there were so many shows that we didn't, right. Well, I

Tony Bottoms:

know like Pinos, you don't have to qualify for their world. And they just, they had, well, actually they had a show last weekend and they had a show. I think it was like a month ago, which was their first show of the year, the hemline over 200 something people there, you know, so, and that's just like a little re I mean, that's one of the Pennell regional ones.

Lori Wunderlich:

I mean, I don't know anybody that would just go to the world show without going to a regional show and at least getting their horse out in the ring and showing it don't think that it hurts them that way after last year. I think people just want to show this really want to get out there and show their horse and have a good time and get back to being with people it's kind of like school, you know, the. Kids don't go to school to learn anything. They go to school because it's social. So people go to those sites because it's social. Right. Right.

Tony Bottoms:

I went to, I was thinking about that unless you got a made horse already, you know, if you got something young, you're going to want to use exposure out for that horse as possible. Right. You're going to go to the regional shows because you know, if you're, you want to go to world to win. Then you're going to go as many shows as you can so that you know what that horse is capable of and you want to get all the kinks out and all that. That was my way of thinking. I'm like, I don't know, you know? Yeah, possibly, but it's like how many made horses are out there or just showing the world, or we would just show the world, you know what I'm saying?

Lori Wunderlich:

So it's the same with riders, you know, like how many people can go. And show it the world show without having been in a horse show for a year. Yeah. Yeah.

Tony Bottoms:

We definitely got to get the cake out most of the time, it's the people, instead of the horses, the horses know their job is the people getting nervous and all that. Well,

Lori Wunderlich:

even putting on the horse shows, you know, like we were in the show office there in April and I said, man, I feel like I haven't been to her show for, you know, two years. And then I went, oh, I haven't. And it it's, you just have to relearn the system. And I think that's the same way with showing horses.

Tony Bottoms:

Right. Ah, well, thank you. Ma'am I appreciate it. I think, I mean, at this time all well, you guys have a good one and thanks again. Bye

Lori Wunderlich:

bye.

Tony Bottoms:

Five bars of silver is the perfect hapless of stock horse stallion for your cow bread or raining bread. Mayor Ms. Buckskin near Liberty is the last fall from his high five. And one of gay bar Silver's best set, both our HPAC hall of fame, inductee Sterling as a champion and raining and ropey, easy to handle and still be unwritten. Sterling is a thinker. If you don't want a smart one, don't bring to him more information. Go to www.top-appaloosas.com. For more information owned by Liz Kincade. Five bars of silver is five panel clean. Well, there you go. That was Laurie wonder Lich. Oh, the garden state Appaloosa association, and also the board of directors for territory five. I always liked talking to people. Who've been involved with regional clubs for a good amount of years. They always seemed to be a wealth of knowledge and always have good insights on how things have been. Especially they've been involved with that regional club for. That entire time, not just as a member, but in the inner workings of what's is going on with that regional clubs. So they've seen a lot of change, you know, like Lori and I talked about things way. Then they went that way. Then they're starting to come back to this way. And so that's always interesting, but anyhow, hope you enjoyed the show. Please go over to Jaime coffee.com/appaloosa and buy me virtual coffee to help to show out. Or go over to patrion.com/appaloosa and become a patron over there. You get the show ad free and you get it early. Same thing with the videos and all that. So anyhow. Y'all have a good day, have a happy day. We'll see you later.